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Conditions InDepth: Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder. It changes the red blood cells into a crescent or sickle shape. The red blood cells stick together and then get trapped in small blood vessels. When the blood vessels are blocked, parts of the body do not get oxygen. This can cause severe pain and damage to organs and tissues.
These abnormal red blood cells are also destroyed at a high rate. This causes anemia.
Red Blood Cells: Normal and Sickled
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Sickle cell disease is caused by genes. People with sickle cell disease receive a defective gene from each parent. When people have only one of the defective genes, it is called sickle cell trait. They will not usually have symptoms but can pass the gene on to their children.
What are the risk factors for sickle cell disease?What are the symptoms of sickle cell disease?How is sickle cell disease diagnosed?What are the treatments for sickle cell disease?Are there screening tests for sickle cell disease?How can I reduce my risk of sickle cell disease?What questions should I ask my doctor?Where can I get more information about sickle cell disease?

References

Facts about sickle cell disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/facts.html. Accessed January 29, 2021.
Pinto VM, Balocco M, et al. Sickle cell disease: a review for the internist. Intern Emerg Med. 2019;14(7):1051-1064.
Sickle cell disease. Kids Health—Nemours Foundation website. Available at: http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/sickle-cell-anemia.html. Accessed January 29, 2021.
Sickle cell disease in adults and adolescents. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/condition/sickle-cell-disease-in-adults-and-adolescents . Accessed March 3, 2021.
Sickle cell disease in infants and children. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/condition/sickle-cell-disease-in-infants-and-children Accessed March 3, 2021.
Sickle cell trait. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/traits.html. Accessed January 29, 2021.
What is sickle cell disease? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sca. Accessed January 29, 2021.

Revision Information

  • Reviewer: EBSCO Medical Review Board Marcin Chwistek, MD
  • Review Date: 03/2020
  • Update Date: 03/03/2021